Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Midterm Study Sheet

WALL PAINTING WITH HORSES, RHINOCEROSES, AND AUROCHS 
Chauvet Cave (France)
c. 32,000–30,000 BCE
Paint on limestone


WOMAN FROM WILLENDORF 
Austria
c. 24,000 BCE
Limestone

MEMORIAL HEAD OF AN OBA 
Nigeria (Africa) 
c. 1500 CE. 
Brass


COLOSSAL FIGURE OF AKHENATEN 
Egypt
c. 1353 BCE
Sandstone with traces of polychromy


HATSHEPSUT KNEELING
Egypt
c. 1473–1458 BCE
Red granite

CYLINDER SEAL AND ITS MODERN IMPRESSION 
Mesopotamia
c. 2600–2500 BCE
Lapis lazuli


GREAT PYRAMIDS
Egypt
c. 2575–2450 BCE 
Limestone and granite


STELE OF HAMMURABI
 Mesopotamia
c. 1792–1750 BCE
Basalt

HIP PENDANT REPRESENTING AN IYOBA 
Nigeria (Africa)
c. 1550 CE
Ivory, iron, and copper

NEFERTITI 
Egypt
c. 1353– 1336 BCE
Painted limestone

Monday, October 9, 2017

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Attributed to the Hirschfeld Workshop FUNERARY KRATER From the Dipylon Cemetery, Athens. c. 750–735 BCE. Ceramic, height 42 5 ⁄8 (108 cm). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Rogers Fund, 1914. (14.130.14)


















• MAN AND CENTAUR Perhaps from Olympia. c. 750 BCE. Bronze, height 4 5 ⁄16 (11.1 cm). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917. (17.190.2072)





OLPE (PITCHER) Corinth. c. 650–625 BCE. Ceramic with black-figure decoration, height 12 7 ⁄8 (32.8 cm). J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu.







DYING WARRIOR From the right corner of the west pediment of the Temple of Aphaia, Aegina. c. 500–490 or 470s BCE. Marble, length 5 6 (1.68 m). Staatliche Antikensammlungen und Glyptothek, Munich.




DYING WARRIOR From the left corner of the east pediment of the Temple of Aphaia, Aegina. c. 490–480 or 470s BCE. Marble, length 6 (1.83 m). Staatliche Antikensammlungen und Glyptothek, Munich.





METROPOLITAN KOUROS Attica, Greece. c. 600–590 BCE. Marble, height 6 4 5 ⁄8 (1.95 m). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Fletcher Fund, 1932. (32.11.1)


• ANAVYSOS KOUROS From the cemetery at Anavysos, near Athens. c. 530 BCE. Marble with remnants of paint, height 6 4 (1.93 m). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.


























• “PEPLOS” KORE From the Akropolis, Athens. c. 530 BCE. Marble, height 4 (1.21 m). Akropolis Museum, Athens.








• Lysippides Painter HERAKLES DRIVING A BULL TO SACRIFICE c. 525–520 BCE. Black-figure decoration on an amphora. Ceramic, height of amphora 20 15 ⁄16 (53.2 cm). Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Henry Lillie Pierce Fund (99.538)




Andokides Painter HERAKLES DRIVING A BULL TO SACRIFICE c. 525–520 BCE. Red-figure decoration on an amphora. Ceramic, height of amphora 20 15 ⁄16 (53.2 cm). Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Henry Lillie Pierce Fund (99.538)




• KRITIOS BOY From the Akropolis, Athens. c. 475 BCE. Marble, height 3 10 (1.17 m). Akropolis Museum, Athens.





CHARIOTEER From the Sanctuary of Apollo, Delphi. c. 470 BCE. Bronze, copper (lips and lashes), silver (hand), onyx (eyes), height 5 11 (1.8 m). Archaeological Museum, Delphi.



WARRIOR Found in the sea off Riace, Italy. c. 460–450 BCE. Bronze with bone and glass eyes, silver teeth, and copper lips and nipples, height 6 9 (2.05 m). National Archeological Museum, Reggio Calabria, Italy.




A SYMPOSIUM SCENE From the Tomb of the Diver, Poseidonia (Roman Paestum). c. 480 BCE. Fresco on travertine slab, height 31 (78 cm). Paestum Museum.



• Exekias (potter and painter) AJAX AND ACHILLES PLAYING A GAME c. 540–530 BCE. Black-figure painting on a ceramic amphora, height of amphora 2 (61 cm). Vatican Museums, Rome.

Breeding Ghost Shrimp Palaemonetes paludosus

Second batch born 10/8/17

Hey, 
Im putting this info here because the information online that I was able to find (at the time of writing) seems misinformed or incorrect. 

Important stuff:

Breedng is easy, just have a male and female

Eggs hatch after about a month

When you first see eggs, place the female in a separate tank for birthing.  You can also wait until you see the eggs look like they are falling off of her, as they get lower, she is about to drop. 

This tank is very important as it will become the nursery.  I don't put any substrate in.  This tank needs to be cycled and aged and stagnant.  No filter (not even sponge) and no water movement.  This tank should also be pretty dirty with as much algae and cloudy green water in it as possible... this is how the larvae survive, they eat the microorganisms that thrive in these pond-like conditions.  

After the female has laid the eggs take her out, she doesn't really lay, she sort of kicks the eggs off of her as they hatch so they are "born" and depending on your vision you can see them pointing downwards right away.  

with her gone, you don't have to do anything, if the tank is old and cycled and you have it all mucked up with too much nutrients (leave fish food in it before they are born) and too much light, they should survive even if you never feed them.  I mean this.  They are very predatory at this age, I have seen them stalk and attack cyclops copepods and other tiny life in the tank.  

If you want, you can also keep some jars of green water growing in your window to make some food for the shrimplets.  

The babies look a lot like mosquito larvae and can sit at the surface or slowly move around by moving these little hair like appendages on their sides, they can move in all directions and like the adults they can zoom with a tail flick if threatened.  They don't have legs at all and hang upside-down most of the time unless attached to something. 

If you can keep them alive for the first 48 hours you are in a good place.  After about three days they "get their legs" and are much easier to care for because they can eat anything, not just tiny lifeforms.  

I put them back with the mom and other adults when they are about 0.5".